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20120920
20120920
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
that was not enough to warrant an investigation. there was nothing the fbi could point to which would single him out for special investigation or attention. was this an intelligence failure in wisconsin? >do you think there could have been things done to prevent this attack that were not done? >> i think the fbi late at where the problem was. they're really good at investigating after the fact, after things happen, but we had a delicate balance between people's constitutional right to assemble and express their speech, however weil, but we also have to be board cleaning and look at ideologies that have long histories of -- forward- looking and the ideologies that have long histories of spawning violence. i'm not talking about doing covert operations and people with extremist police, but i think it is important we have an overt monitoring police system on what is causing people to act of violence may. was this an intelligence failure? i do not think it is. but one thing the department of homeland security and the fbi could have done -- where was the warning the that sikhs and muslims have been victim
no longer comment on it because the fbi's conducting an investigation, and, therefore, if you have questions, bring them to the department of justice, the same department of justice you used to run. but they said the d. of justice isn't going the talk to you either. then we started to get leaks about who was really behind this, and it wasn't spontaneous, and this was a planned terror attack, and there was some heads up about it, and now they come out and say, okay, it was a terror act. does that shift it? no longer doj, now this is a military thing that the pentagon should be talking to us about? >> correct. correct. and, um, it was -- it's obvious that, it was always obvious that it was a terrorist attack. the fact is that the ambassador's presence in, um -- was supposed to be confidential, the fact is that they knew -- megyn: got to cut you off, general, because we're going up against a hard break. thank you so much. be right back. megyn: well, an unemployment report released this morning suggests things are not getting better on the jobs front. economists expected 375,000 new jobless clai
with the vice chair of the joint chiefs, experts of the fbi, also the state department. from all over to try to give a more broad explanation to these members. so, i think a lot of it depends on that. having said that, brooke, i think i have talked to you in front of several of these closed door meetings after various events that have gone on globally and we have talked about this before that these members of the administration especially hillary clinton who was a senator they know talking to all members that even though it's a classified session they want to be careful about the information they give because tends to come out to people like you and me. >> uh-huh. we report that information sometimes when it's on the record, dana bash. another one for you because cnn's reporting that the ambassador believed he was on a hit list, an al qaeda hit ris. do we know was secretary clinton at all aware of that? >> reporter: she herself was asked about that at a press conference just before she came over here to the hill and her answer was, i have absolutely no information or reason to believe there
, particularly in the benghazi area. >> reporter: the fbi is leading the investigation. their team now on the ground in libya responsible for collecting the evidence intended to help whittle down that suspect list. >> we are conducting interviews, gathering evidence and trying to sort out the facts working with our partners both from a criminal standpoint as well as in the intelligence community to try to determine exactly what took place on the ground that evening. >> reporter: there are significant challenges facing u.s. investigators and the intelligence community. for one, getting a level of granularity that will allow them to identify individuals and their associations with various groups. another challenge, sifting through whatever information or evidence was left behind at a crime scene that was never really secured. all against a backdrop of concern for the investigators' safety. >> the fbi has a track record of being able to go into these places that are volatile and be able to put together a criminal case. we've done it in yemen with the coal bombing. we did it in east africa
counterterrorism center, the fbi come in the very charged with attacking our nation from terrorism and other disasters will be flashed in an indiscriminate way that it are signs were more potentially harming such vital programs as border security, intelligence analysis and the fbi's work. i have time and budget constraints require everyone to sacrifice and priorities to be sat and ways to be eliminated, we should ask where resources can be spent more effectively and what trade-offs should be made to balance the risk we face with the security we can afford. but we cannot afford, however is to weaken a homeland security structure that is helping to protect the citizens of this country. thank you, mr. chairman. >> thank you, secretary collins. secretary napolitano correct thank you for being with us through at the time through >> thank you through lieberman through like to thank director olson further partnership. mr. chairman, this is my 17th appearance before you. is my 44th here in overall since becoming president. i'm grateful for the tireless advocacy on behalf of dhs, not only during its
. domestic discretionary funding is the money that's used to keep the government operating each year. f.b.i. agents investigating case -gs, border patrol eights working our -- border patrol agents working our borders, employees mailing out social security checks and many other important programs and functions. it's already at its lowest level since a shared g.d.p. since the 1950's. it's hard to imagine any other federal investment not being jeopardized by such draconian cuts. and that is why president reagan -- president reagan's former economic advisor said about this ryan budget plan, "the ryan plan is a monstrosity." the reagan economic advisor. ronald reagan's economic advisor said "the ryan plan is a monstrosity. the rich would receive huge tax cuts while the social safety net would be shredded to pay for them. it is less of a wish list than a fairy tale, you utterly disconnd from the real world, backed up by make-believe numbers and unreasonable assumptions." if that's what ronald reagan's economic advisor thought about it, think what regular people might think about it. ryan's plan i
that threatens the safety and liberty of the sih community. while the f.b.i. tracks the overall number of hate crimes, it doesn't target sikhs despite that we are seeing that sikhs are singled out because of their appearance and faith. that's why this resolution denounces the violence befallen this community or calling on the department of justice to finally be documenting and quantifying hate crimes against sikh americans. as many as three out of four sikh boys endure torment and bullying from their peers and so we're educators across the country to help end violence. and we're erging law enforcement officers in every locality to do all they can to prevent violence against this and all communities. america was founded on the principles of religious freedom, acceptance and tolerance. let's make sure that every american can live safely and in peace. let's make sure that every american is protected. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. the chair recognizes the gentleman from texas, mr. poe, for five minutes. mr. poe: thank you, mr. speaker. over the last week, we have watched as
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)

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